INDUSTRIAL HERITAGE INFORMATION CENTRE - Industrial Heritage Information Centre

INDUSTRIAL HERITAGE INFORMATION CENTRE

FREE OF CHARGE

ADVANCED BOOKING REQUIRED

Open: 10:00-17:00 (Last Admission by 16:30) ;
Closed on Sat & Sun; Public Holidays; 29th Dec to 3rd Jan

Annex to Statistics Bureau, Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications
19-1 Wakamatsu-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-0056 Japan Tel: 0120-973-310

ACCESS

The Centre requests for all guests to make an advanced booking in order for us to provide the safest environment as well as to reduce the spread of COVID-19.

The Centre offers 3 slots of "2-hour-guided tour" per day. Each slot (2 hour-guided tour) is available for up to 10 people.

The Centre offers audio guidance (a set of tablet and headset) for those who are speakers of the English and Korean languages at the Reception because the guided tour is currently conducted only in the Japanese language.

BOOKING

INDUSTRIAL HERITAGE INFORMATION CENTREINDUSTRIAL HERITAGE INFORMATION CENTRE

Industrial Heritage Information Centre, as a comprehensive information hub, is to support the Interpretation Strategy (submitted to the UNESCO World Heritage Centre in November 2017 for "Sites of Japan's Meiji Industrial Revolution: Iron and Steel, Shipbuilding, and Coal Mining") by closely working together with other associated visitor centers located across 11 cities in 8 prefectures.

The Information Centre is also designated as a "think-tank" that is to focus on the following matters: Documenting industrial history and heritage located both domestically and internationally; Research and Study; Public Relations; Education & Training; Conservation and Utilization; Digital Archives; and Information dissemination that includes industrial labour and workers' lives.

©NIPPON STEEL CORPORATION Kyushu Works [Private Facility]

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Communicating the heritage to both this and future generations

Communicating the heritage to both this and future generations

Meiji Japan's transformation into an industrial nation in the second half of the 19th century was an extraordinary phenomenon at that time unique in the history. We must communicate the heritage to both this and future generations.

Information

coming soon

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